Kyanite

saf-ahyuh r

Kyanite is named for the Greek word for blue, kyanos. And what a blue! Fine Nepali kyanite can resemble the finest sapphire. Kyanite was a gem far better known to mineral collectors until more recent finds in the Kali Gandaki river region of west central Nepal, the first source to produce a significant amount of facet grade kyanite. Prior to the Nepal discoveries, Brazil was a major source of mineral specimen material, but kyanite also occurs in a variety of locations around the world. More recent kyanite discoveries have yielded additional colors, including orange and green.

Kyanite Polished
Kyanite Classification
Common Name Kyanite
Species Kyanite
Kyanite Optical Properties
Transparency Transparent - Translucent
Dispersion Strength: Moderate Fire Value: 0.02
Refractive Index 1.716-1.731
Tolerance:(+0.004/-0.004)
Birefringence 0.012-0.017
Optic Character Biaxial
Optic Sign Positive
Polariscope Reaction Doubly Refractive (DR)
Fluorescence SWUV: Weak red
LWUV: Weak red
Pleochroism Trichroic, moderate to strong colorless, dark blue, and violet-blue
Kyanite Characteristic Physical Properties
Hardness 5.5-7
Streak White
Specific Gravity 3.560-3.690 Range:0.01/-0.12 Typical:3.680
Toughness Poor
Inclusions Kyanite displays color zoning often in bands and may appear fibrous. Stones may contain natural inclusions.
Luster Vitreous
Fracture Uneven
Cleavage Perfect, in one direction, Good, in two directions
Kyanite Chemistry & Crystallography
Chemical Name aluminum silicate
Chemical Formula Al2SiO5
Crystal System Triclinic
Chemistry Classification Silicate

Kyanite Colors

  • Blue Kyanite Blue
  • Orange Kyanite Orange
  • Green Kyanite Green

Kyanite Spectra

Kyanite Spectra
KYANITE

Color due to manganese. The spectrum has a distinctive narrow absorption band at 555nm. The color is due to manganese in which case a thinner and more transparent specimen may reveal some lines in the blue - violet. The intensive absorption here in that area did not permit sufficient transmission to detect these

Jewelry Television acknowledges the significant scientific contributions of John S Harris, FGA to the study of gemstone spectra and with deep appreciation to him, acknowledges the use of his images and related notes about gemstones and their spectra in the educational materials on this website.

Alternate Names

Cyanite Or Disthene

Countries of Origin

Tanzania, United Republic Of; Pakistan; United States of America (the); Unknown; China; Namibia; Brazil; South Africa; Madagascar; Australia; Nepal; India

History

The kyanite name comes from the Greek word, kyanos, which means "blue". The bright, cornflower-like color transforms an ordinary piece of jewelry into a statement-making display. Although the earliest kyanite on the market was primarily blue, discoveries of green and orange have expanded choices in this gemstone. Kyanite has a hardness from 4 ½ - 7 on the Mohs scale because of its cleavage. For the lapidary (stone cutter), this poses a real challenge. The cleavage and hardness vary depending on the direction in which it is cut. Despite the challenges in cutting, kyanite is highly desirable. It's all about the color -and wow! What color kyanite delivers!

Care

Be mindful of cleaning and storing this lovely stone. Avoid ultra-sonic cleaners. A dip in warm, sudsy water and a soft brush will keep your kyanite looking its best. Carefully store kyanite when you aren't wearing it.

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More About Kyanite

It's believed by some people that kyanite calms the mind and spirit and brings tranquility. For an intensely blue stone, that certainly makes sense, since blue is thought to be a calming color. It's also believed that kyanite doesn't hold negativity. Instead, it aligns all chakras, is said to provide balance, and stimulates self-expression. Many find it to be a fine meditation stone. The folkloric attributes of kyanite are not supported by science. We can't affirm anything about the mind and spirit, but we think you'll enjoy your kyanite for its tranquil, blue color.

Sisk Gemology Reference

Showcasing 200 gemstones in over 1,000 pages and accompanied by more than 2,000 photos, The Sisk Gemology Reference is a must-have in every collector’s library. Each comprehensive, three-volume set features state-of-the-art photography, detailed illustrations, and scientifically precise descriptions to create an entrancing experience for gemstone amateurs and afficionados alike.

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Tim Matthews

Author

Tim Matthews

Tim Matthews is President and Chief Executive Officer of Jewelry Television® (JTV), as well as a member of the company's Board of Directors. He oversees and leads all aspects of the company's powerful omni-digital retail platform that uniquely specializes in fine jewelry and gemstones. His passion for business and gemstones has led him to become a recognized expert in the field of gemology. He is a life member of the Gemmological Association of Great Britain (Gem-A) and has earned Gem-A's highest degrees, the Gemmology (FGA) and Diamond (DGA) diplomas. He is also a Graduate Gemologist (GG) of the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) and has also completed GIA's Graduate Diplomas in Diamonds, Colored Stones and Pearls. Under his leadership, JTV has become the leader in the sourcing and selling of color gemstones and jewelry.

This page was created on June 27, 2014.

This page was last edited on October 24, 2019.