Fluorite

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A plentiful, affordable, and colorful gem, many consider fluorite one of the most popular collector's stones worldwide. Fluorite often has excellent clarity and crosses the entire color spectrum. One of the most famous fluorescent minerals, fluorite often requires no type of treatment to enhance its appearance. Also prized for its color-change and distinctive multi-color banded varieties, this beautiful stone has so many appealing features, it's no wonder that Roman historian Pliny the Elder named fluorite his "most precious substance."

Fluorite Polished
Fluorite Classification
Common Name Fluorite
Species Fluorite
Fluorite Optical Properties
Transparency Transparent - Translucent
Dispersion Strength: Weak Fire Value: 0.007
Refractive Index 1.434-1.434
Tolerance:(+0.001/-0.001)
Optic Character NA
Optic Sign NA
Polariscope Reaction Singly Refractive (SR)
Fluorescence SWUV: Variable
LWUV: Variable
Pleochroism None
Fluorite Characteristic Physical Properties
Hardness 4
Streak White
Specific Gravity 3.000-3.250 Range:0.07/-0.18 Typical:3.180
Toughness Poor
Inclusions Fluorite will sometimes have triangular negative crystals, mineral inclusions, color zoning, healing cracks 2-phase and 3-phase inclusions and liquid inclusions. Might have pits or scratches on surface.
Luster Vitreous
Stability Fair
Fracture Conchoidal, Step-Like
Cleavage Perfect, in four directions
Fluorite Chemistry & Crystallography
Chemical Name calcium fluoride
Chemical Formula CaF2
Crystal System Cubic
Chemistry Classification Halide

Fluorite Colors

  • Green Fluorite Green
  • White Fluorite White
  • Red Fluorite Red
  • Orange Fluorite Orange
  • Multi-color Fluorite Multi-color
  • Gray Fluorite Gray
  • Colorless Fluorite Colorless
  • Brown Fluorite Brown
  • Black Fluorite Black
  • Bi-color Fluorite Bi-color
  • Yellow Fluorite Yellow
  • Blue Fluorite Blue
  • Purple Fluorite Purple
  • Pink Fluorite Pink

Fluorite Spectra

Fluorite Spectra
FLUORITE Greenish Blue

Color due to color centers and rare earths. The main feature in the spectrum from a large blue fluorite crystal from Pakistan is a broad area of absorption from 550nm. to 625nm. A weak narrow line is present at 48nm; and there are three faint bands in the orange and red areas centered at 635nm., 650nm, and 675nm. which are barely visible in this image. Transmission in the violet end cuts off about 440nm. and in the red at 690nm.

Fluorite Spectra
Lab Created FLUORITE

Color due to rare earth element, possibly erbium. A wide and intense absorption in the green and violet with narrower and weaker bands in the orange-red area.

Jewelry Television acknowledges the significant scientific contributions of John S Harris, FGA to the study of gemstone spectra and with deep appreciation to him, acknowledges the use of his images and related notes about gemstones and their spectra in the educational materials on this website.

Alternate Names

Fluorspar, Rainbow Fluorite

Countries of Origin

Tanzania, United Republic Of; Afghanistan; Argentina; United States of America (the); Viet Nam; India; Spain; Canada; Mongolia; Pakistan; Morocco; Unknown; China; Namibia; Brazil; Mexico; South Africa; Bulgaria; Nepal; United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)

History

A plentiful, affordable, and colorful gem, fluorite is popular with collectors worldwide. Fluorite often has excellent clarity and crosses the entire color spectrum. One of the most famous fluorescent minerals, fluorite often requires no type of treatment to enhance its appearance. Also prized for its color-change and distinctive multi-color banded varieties, this beautiful stone has so many appealing features, it's no wonder that Roman historian Pliny the Elder named fluorite his "most precious substance."

Care

Wear your fluorite earrings and necklaces every day but save your rings for less frequent wear. This bright stone will offer you years of pleasure if you treat it with care.

Shop Fluorite

Related Videos

More About Fluorite

Many powers are ascribed to fluorite in the world of the metaphysical. Historically, it's linked to thought and intelligence. Some people believe it may help one to rediscover the path to happiness and to align the mind with the true desires of the heart.

Fluorite Gemstone

Sisk Gemology Reference

Showcasing 200 gemstones in over 1,000 pages and accompanied by more than 2,000 photos, The Sisk Gemology Reference is a must-have in every collector’s library. Each comprehensive, three-volume set features state-of-the-art photography, detailed illustrations, and scientifically precise descriptions to create an entrancing experience for gemstone amateurs and afficionados alike.

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Species/Variety

Blue John

Blue John is the banded purple and white or yellow variety of fluorite. The major source of this color-zoned fluorite is Castleton in Derbyshire, England, where it is found in at least 14 differently patterned veins.

Blue John Fluorite
Blue John Classification
Common Name Blue John
Blue John Characteristic Physical properties
Inclusions Blue John will sometimes have triangular negative crystals, mineral inclusions, color zoning, healing cracks 2-phase and 3-phase inclusions and liquid inclusions. Bluish violet to purple bands in a reddish to colorless background. Might have pits or scratches.Look to see if the stone has been impregnated with resin.

Optical Phenomena

Color Change Fluorite

Fluorite crystals occur in white, black, clear, and various shades of every color in the rainbow. Color change fluorite is rare, but has been discovered, usually with a blue to purple change. To observe this natural phenomenon, view your gemstone interchangeably in natural and incandescent lighting environments.

Color Change Fluorite Fluorite
Color Change Fluorite Classification
Common Name Color Change Fluorite
Color Change Fluorite Optical Properties
Fluorescence SWUV: Variable, but can be strong blue violet
LWUV: Variable, but can be strong blue violet
Color Change Fluorite Characteristic Physical properties
Inclusions Fluorite will sometimes have triangular negative crystals, mineral inclusions, color zoning, healing cracks 2-phase and 3-phase inclusions and liquid inclusions. Might have pits or scratches on surface.
Tim Matthews

Author

Tim Matthews

Tim Matthews is President and Chief Executive Officer of Jewelry Television® (JTV), as well as a member of the company's Board of Directors. He oversees and leads all aspects of the company's powerful omni-digital retail platform that uniquely specializes in fine jewelry and gemstones. His passion for business and gemstones has led him to become a recognized expert in the field of gemology. He is a life member of the Gemmological Association of Great Britain (Gem-A) and has earned Gem-A's highest degrees, the Gemmology (FGA) and Diamond (DGA) diplomas. He is also a Graduate Gemologist (GG) of the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) and has also completed GIA's Graduate Diplomas in Diamonds, Colored Stones and Pearls. Under his leadership, JTV has become the leader in the sourcing and selling of color gemstones and jewelry.

This page was created on June 27, 2014.

This page was last edited on October 24, 2019.