Hematite | Gemopedia

Hematite is a dark gray to black mineral known to various cultures throughout history. Babylonians, Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans were a few of the civilizations that made use of this mineral. Hematite derives its name from a Greek word for blood, an allusion to the reddish powder produced during the fashioning process due to the presence of iron.
Colors
Dark Gray To Black

Hematite Classification

Common Name

Hematite

Species

Hematite

Variety

Colors

Dark Gray To Black

Alternate Names

Gemstone Groups

Hematite

Key Separations

Appearance, fracture and SG. Hematite is only slightly magnetic whereas synthetic hematine is moderately magnetic.

Comments

Misnomers: black diamond, black pearl and Alaskan black diamond.

Hematite Optical Properties

Transparency

Opaque

Refractive Index

Over The Limit 2.94-3.22
Tolerance:(-0.070)

Birefringence

0.28

Optic Character

Optic Sign

Polariscope Reaction

Doubly Refractive (DR)

Fluorescence

SWUV: Inert
LWUV: Inert

CCF Reaction

Pleochroism

None

Dispersion

Comments

Hematite Chemistry & Crystallography

Chemical Name

iron oxide

Chemical Formula

iron oxide

Synthesis

Crystal System

Trigonal

Classification

Oxide

Nature

Natural

Crystallinity

Crystalline

Comments

Hematite Characteristic Physical Properties

Hardness

5.5-6.5

Streak

Red-Brown

Specific Gravity

4.95-5.28 Typical:5.2

Toughness

Excellent

Inclusions

Hematite will have a reddish color in surface fractures. Intaglios will show engraver marks.

Luster

Metallic

Stability

Poor

Fracture

Splintery, Granular, Subconchodial

Cleavage

None

Comments

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